RJS
Rachel Johanna Spencer
BRINGING WATER TO THE SURFACE

Redmond Airport

BRINGING WATER TO THE SURFACE

BRINGING WATER TO THE SURFACE

Flying over the arid desert, one would not be aware that vast amounts of water is moving in the earth beneath the surface. We can see water is present in the landscape as it is brought up through wells and sprayed through center pivot irrigation equipment, creating a circular pattern in crops when viewed from above.

 The hydrological cycle plays an important role in the vitality of Redmond, Oregon where surface water and groundwater are essentially one resource. The stormwater system designed in the city is there to protect the purity of the groundwater aquifer, which is the sole source for Redmond’s water supply.

The hydrological cycle plays an important role in the vitality of Redmond, Oregon where surface water and groundwater are essentially one resource. The stormwater system designed in the city is there to protect the purity of the groundwater aquifer, which is the sole source for Redmond’s water supply.

 This landscape master plan’s main purpose is to connect the people to the idea of water in the arid landscape, its importance, and how it moves. By bringing water to the surface we can celebrate and become better connected to the relationship of surface water and groundwater.

This landscape master plan’s main purpose is to connect the people to the idea of water in the arid landscape, its importance, and how it moves. By bringing water to the surface we can celebrate and become better connected to the relationship of surface water and groundwater.

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gray to green oasis gardens

gray to green oasis gardens

Gray water recycling systems are a great way to re-use water and use as irrigation. The application of gray water reuse provides substantial benefits for both the water supply by reducing the demand for fresh water, and the demand on wastewater treatment, reducing the amount of water that is returned to water treatment facilities. As people circulate through the grey water oasis gardens, the periodic irrigation can connect people to how fast water drains through the native vesicular basalt landscape.

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seeping water entrance wall

seeping water entrance wall

This idea of how water moves in this particular landscape will also be shown through evaporation as the stain of the basalt rocks change with the heat of the sun. This may also be noticed by the entrance wall water feature. As the water ever so slightly seeps down the face and changes with the heat of the day. The basalt cuts rise out of the ground upon approach and descend back into the earth at departure.

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interactive sculpture garden

interactive sculpture garden

Traveling north towards Redmond, there is opportunity found with the creation of a sculpture park. Here one can traverse mounds and climb up on the surface and/ or through, to act themselves as water. This area would provide places for play, extra parking and extend the cities opportunity for art installations.

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moisture farming & self-sowing desert wildflowers

moisture farming & self-sowing desert wildflowers

Desert plants act quickly when water is present. They bloom and seed with furry. Seed bombing is a technique used to spread seeds to land by throwing or dropping compressed bundles of soil and live vegetation. These projects are often done in arid and off-limit land. This “seed bombing” can be related again to a drop of water coming down from the sky to be absorbed by the landscape.

Alfalfa hay is produced in all three counties of Central Oregon and is the plant that is generally seen from above in the crop circle patterns in this area. The Alfalfa plant can be adopted in phytoremediation of oil-contaminated soil to protect groundwater. Growing Alfalfa with water harvested from the air can be a demonstration of a progressive technology. By absorbing water from the air, instead of extracting it out of the ground, preserves the source that the community depend on.

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